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The Larchmont Shipwreck  New York and New England's (Wreck Valley)
Historical and current New York and New England Shipwreck Information and images for scuba divers and fisherman.
 

Side scan sonar image of the Larchmont. Courtesy Mark Munro, American Underwater Search and Survey.

 

LARCHMONT

The paddle wheel steamship Larchmont was built in 1885 in Bath Maine. She was originally named the Cumberland. She was 252 feet long had a 37 foot beam and displaced 1,650gross tons. In 1902 she was purchased by the Joy Steamship Line and re-named Larchmont.

February 11th, 1907the Larchmont left Providence, Rhode Island en-route for New York. A winter storm soon struck which caused high seas and reduced visibility. The Larchmont and the coal schooner Harry P. Knowlton collided in this blizzard. The Larchmont went down within 20 minutes, only three miles from Watch Hill, Rhode Island. According to the New York Times " The schooner came on with a speed that almost seemed to equal the gale that had been pushing her toward Boston. Even before another warning signal could be sounded on the steamer's whistle, the schooner crashed into the port side of the Larchmont."  Captain McVey claims he was the last to leave his sinking ship. Other survivors claim the Captain and his crew were in the very first lifeboat, leaving the frantic passengers to fend for themselves. Due mostly to the freezing winter weather over 143 perished.

The Larchmont now sits in 135 feet of water in the Long Island Sound, only 3 miles from Watch Hill. Capt Eric Takakjian reports that one of the Larchmount's paddle wheels stands upright. The other is lying down. Her hull is intact with visibility averaging 5 to 10 feet. Diving is only recommended at slack high water. This wreck is loaded with artifacts.


 

 
   

 

 

 

 
 

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